Chase Sapphire Reserve Credit Card: Trip Insurance 7 Ugly Truths

***UPDATE 6/15/17-  CHASE PAID OUR FULL CLAIM ! ***

No one plans an emergency on vacation.  Unfortunately, it just happens.  It is one of the worst fears for travelers– becoming ill on a trip, or someone you love becomes ill and you have to rush home.

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So, when we applied for the Chase Sapphire Reserve Credit Card, we knew the $450 Annual Fee was pretty steep, but it was worth it for the benefits like the extra points and the “Trip Cancellation/ Trip Interruption Insurance”.

In April, when we had to rush home from Scotland, there was a tiny bit of comfort knowing we could file a claim with Chase to recoup some of the expenses we incurred for all the travel changes.   Changing your travel plans at the last minute, is very, very costly.  But in an emergency, there is nothing you can do about it.

We found out some very ugly truths about the travel insurance benefit and I will share them with you.

UGLY TRUTH #1:  DOCUMENTS, DOCUMENTS, AND MORE DOCUMENTS

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Try using the benefit.  It was easier to buy a house than recoup any loss from Chase.  It has been roughly 60 days, 60 documents, endless tweets, multiple calls, plenty of emails and still nothing.  All for a $1500 claim and some points.  And– don’t get me started on our time invested.

 

UGLY TRUTH #2:  RIDICULOUS DEMANDS

  • Let’s start with the claim form.  Here it is.   If that doesn’t get you to walk away, I don’t know what will…
  • That’s just the claim form, here’s what to send with it:
    • Copy of the detailed original and updated travel itinerary and/or the Common carrier tickets
    • Confirmation of the reason for the trip – medical documents, death certificate….etc.
    • Common of the CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICIES FOR THE AIRLINES, TOUR, TRAINS, ETC.
    • Proof of expenses
    • Copy of the settlement response from the carrier outlining the claim breakdown
  • Letter from your airline on LETTERHEAD!!  Sure Chase– let me call the automated robot at Norwegian Air and see if she will write me a “Sorry I Was Absent” note on their letterhead.  
  • Let’s not forget the refund policies from every single taxi, train, plane, automobile, hotel, Airbnb, tour, ferry, bus, museum–basically any entity you want your money back from.

 

UGLY TRUTH #3:  YOU ARE NOT ACTUALLY DEALING WITH CHASE

Their travel insurance is actually underwritten by a third party who’s primary incentive is not to reimburse you.  Chase Customer Support always connects you to the ‘mystery group’ who are about as helpful as “Tits on a bull”, as my old boss would say.

And for the life of me, I can’t figure out who the underwriter is so I can cut to the chase (ha! pun) and complain to them instead.  Here’s a screenshot at the bottom of the emails–see if you can find someone:

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UGLY TRUTH #3:  WHAT DOES CUSTOMER SERVICE HAVE TO DO WITH IT?

Absolutely Nothing.   What’s it worth to Chase Sapphire Reserve for a happy customer?Not a thing.   We signed up with Chase not the underwriter.  A happy customer that pays $450/year for a card and charges everything should mean something.

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UGLY TRUTH #4:  IT’S ALL OR NOTHING, NO PARTIAL REFUNDS

There is no partial refund.  They don’t go through the claim, like your health insurance, and reimburse you for what they think is legit.  It’s all of the claim or none of the claim.   Like health insurance, I would be fine with them approving some or part of it just so I can walk away and never ever deal with them again.

 

UGLY TRUTH #5:  YOU ARE NOT BEING HONEST

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The word ‘fraud, state prison, false’, are written all over the correspondence.  I understand there are plenty of crooks out there but geez–I think good intentions should account for something.  When you respond to all their requests for documents, receipts, over and over and over again–some independent thinker at the underwriter should actually make the decision your an HONEST ABE and approve the claim.  Let the law handle it if you submit a fraudulent claim.

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UGLY TRUTH #6:  THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO A PHYSICAL EXAM OR AUTOPSY

I am not making this stuff up, this is right out of their benefits book.

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UGLY TRUTH #7:  THEY ARE HOPING YOU GIVE UP

I don’t give up easily, I always stand up for what I believe in– but they are wearing me down.  Their endless stream of  paperwork requests, tweeting, calling, emails–makes you wonder if it’s all worth it.   A stress free life sometimes wins out.

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I am sure that’s the goal.   They are hoping you get fed up and walk away.

 

WHAT ABOUT FRAUD BY THE CREDIT CARD COMPANY?

So the credit card company is worried about me submitting a bogus claim, but what about them?  What’s my recourse when I think they are blatantly giving me the run around–hoping I give up?  Where’s all the fine print for the consumer?

I do have one last hope–I actually spoke to a ‘manager’ today at Chase or the underwriter, I never know who I am talking to.  He says, he will look over the paper work and call me tomorrow–I am not holding my breath for any resolution.

But if all else fails, I will file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and use my social media ‘voice’.

And in case you’re wondering–everyone is happy and healthy here!  That’s all that really counts in life, right? 

Take care everyone!  #✌🏼. . . 👩🏻‍⚕️👨🏼‍🚒🔛🔥

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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